superrealism

(redirected from superrealistic)

su·per·re·al·ism

 (so͞o′pər-rē′ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
An artistic and literary movement characterized by extreme realism.

su′per·re′al, su′per·re′al·is′tic adj.
su′per·re′al·ist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

superrealism

(ˌsuːpəˈrɪəˌlɪzəm)
n
(Art Movements) another name for surrealism
ˌsuperˈrealist n, adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Surrealism, Superrealism

a controversial movement in art and literature between the two World Wars in which the artist attempted to portray, express, or interpret the workings of the subconscious mind; in painting it found expression in two techniques, the naturalistic (Dali) and the abstract (Miró). — Surrealist, n.Surrealistic, adj.
See also: Art
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
e STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths) Centre opens this September, and will use superrealistic training to help bridge the engineering skills gap in the region.
(35) Seuphor's point of view was shared--indeed, to a large degree, inspired--by the most respected figure in the Cercle et carre group, Mondrian, who, in the second issue of the journal published an article on realistic and superrealistic art, writing:
We try to make things look superrealistic so there's a weird part of the brain that registers, "Wait a second, I saw tissue and sinew and bone and muscle all inside of that wound.
Acknowledging its own impossibility--the very "fantasy of fantasy" (Bould 84)--fantasy becomes not un-real but, as Le Guin says, "surrealistic, superrealistic, a heightening of reality" (84).
One, for instance, is of a boy asleep in his bed, with several bright spots of light hovering over him; the title is "Archie Smith, Boy Wonder," and the line reads: "A tiny voice asked: 'Is he the one?'" The black-and-white illustrations are superrealistic; each frame is an enigma, a tantalizing invitation to step into the role of Storyteller--a fertile jumping-off point for a flight of the imagination.
While Hanson lived and worked in Florida for many years, this exhibition is the first large-scale one to focus primarily on his Midwestern roots and their influence on his superrealistic forms of ordinary folks going about their business.
Freed from the banality of merchandising that constrained the "Celebration" series and from the saccharine simplification of emblems of childhood that characterized "Easyfun"--a 1999-2000 series that retreated into nursery-school subject matter associated with Koons's young son--the five canvases on view here (all works 2002) unabashedly indulged in a mesmerizing, maximal onslaught of cleverly composed, superrealistic depictions of the lush life.