thymus


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thy·mus

(thī′məs)
n. pl. thy·mus·es
1. A small glandular organ that is situated behind the top of the breastbone, consisting mainly of lymphatic tissue and serving as the site of T cell differentiation. The thymus increases gradually in size and activity until puberty, after which it begins to atrophy.
2. A similar structure in other vertebrate animals.

[New Latin, from Greek thumos, warty excrescence, thymus.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

thymus

(ˈθaɪməs)
n, pl -muses or -mi (-maɪ)
(Physiology) a glandular organ of vertebrates, consisting in man of two lobes situated below the thyroid. In early life it produces lymphocytes and is thought to influence certain immunological responses. It atrophies with age and is almost nonexistent in the adult
[C17: from New Latin, from Greek thumos sweetbread]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

thy•mus

(ˈθaɪ məs)

n., pl. -mus•es, -mi (-mī).
a ductless, butterfly-shaped gland lying at the base of the neck, formed mostly of lymphatic tissue and aiding in the production of T cells of the immune system: after puberty, the lymphatic tissue gradually degenerates. Also called thy′mus gland`.
[1685–95; < New Latin < Greek thýmos]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

thy·mus

(thī′məs)
An organ in vertebrate animals located behind the top of the sternum (breastbone) where lymphocytes called T cells develop. In humans, the thymus stops growing in early childhood and gradually shrinks in size through adulthood.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

thymus

A lymphoid endocrine gland in the chest involved in immunity.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thymus - large genus of Old World mints: thymeThymus - large genus of Old World mints: thyme
asterid dicot genus - genus of more or less advanced dicotyledonous herbs and some trees and shrubs
family Labiatae, family Lamiaceae, Labiatae, Lamiaceae, mint family - a large family of aromatic herbs and shrubs having flowers resembling the lips of a mouth and four-lobed ovaries yielding four one-seeded nutlets and including mint; thyme; sage; rosemary
thyme - any of various mints of the genus Thymus
2.thymus - a ductless glandular organ at the base of the neck that produces lymphocytes and aids in producing immunitythymus - a ductless glandular organ at the base of the neck that produces lymphocytes and aids in producing immunity; atrophies with age
ductless gland, endocrine gland, endocrine - any of the glands of the endocrine system that secrete hormones directly into the bloodstream
immune system - a system (including the thymus and bone marrow and lymphoid tissues) that protects the body from foreign substances and pathogenic organisms by producing the immune response
cervix, neck - the part of an organism (human or animal) that connects the head to the rest of the body; "he admired her long graceful neck"; "the horse won by a neck"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
brzlík
kateenkorva
thymuszwezerik
grasica
brässthymus

thymus

[ˈθaɪməs] N (thymuses, thymi (pl)) [ˈθaɪmaɪ]timo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

thy·mus

n. timo, glándula situada en la parte inferior del cuello y anterosuperior de la cavidad torácica que desempeña un papel de importancia en la función inmunológica.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

thymus

n (pl -mi o -muses) timo
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another discovery was that levels of immune cells produced by the thymus (T cells) -- specifically those associated with the prevention of allergies and autoimmune conditions, such as diabetes -- were lower in children whose mothers developed preeclampsia, even four years after birth.
In addition to these relevant uses, TRECs counts can be useful for evaluating thymic function, particularly in early life, which is considered the period when the role of the thymus is most important (6).
Immune tolerance is only educated in thymus. Thymus dysfunction in producing neuroendocrine-related antigens in the development of tolerance will lead to autoimmune response directed to neuroendocrine glands.
This study is a part of the series investigation about the effects of spermine supplementation on immune function and antioxidant status in the thymus and spleen of piglets [3].
Keywords: Thymus, Head and neck neoplasms, Pediatrics.
Above 90% of myasthenia gravis cases had abnormal thymus including 70% thymic lymphoid hyperplasia and 20% thymoma [4].
In the case of conventional allo-HSCT, allo-HSC are transplanted into the host, and allo-T cells develop in the host thymus (Figure 1(a)).
Normal structures in the prevascular compartment include the thymus, fat, lymph nodes and the left brachiocephalic vein.
The thymus and spleen of mice were separated and weighed.