tiller

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till·er 1

 (tĭl′ər)
n.
One that tills land: a tiller of soil.

til·ler 2

 (tĭl′ər)
n.
A lever used to turn a rudder and steer a boat.

[Middle English tiler, stock of a crossbow, from Old French telier, from Medieval Latin tēlārium, weaver's beam, from Latin tēla, web, weaver's beam; see teks- in Indo-European roots.]

til·ler 3

 (tĭl′ər)
n.
A shoot, especially one that sprouts from the base of a grass or sedge.
intr.v. til·lered, til·ler·ing, til·lers
To send forth shoots from the base. Used of a plant.

[Middle English *tiller, from Old English telgor.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tiller

(ˈtɪlə)
n
(Nautical Terms) nautical a handle fixed to the top of a rudderpost to serve as a lever in steering it
[C14: from Anglo-French teiler beam of a loom, from Medieval Latin tēlārium, from Latin tēla web]
ˈtillerless adj

tiller

(ˈtɪlə)
n
1. (Botany) a shoot that arises from the base of the stem in grasses
2. (Botany) a less common name for sapling
vb
(Botany) (intr) (of a plant) to produce tillers
[Old English telgor twig; related to Icelandic tjalga branch]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

till•er1

(ˈtɪl ər)

n.
1. a person who tills; farmer.
2. a thing that tills.

til•ler2

(ˈtɪl ər)

n.
a bar or lever fitted to the head of a rudder, for turning the rudder in steering.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Anglo-French teiler weaver's beam; Old French teilier < Medieval Latin tēlārium= Latin tēl(a) warp + -ārium -ary]

til•ler3

(ˈtɪl ər)

n.
1. a plant shoot that springs from the root or bottom of the original stalk.
v.i.
2. (of a plant) to put forth new shoots from the root or bottom of the original stalk.
[before 1000; Old English telgor twig, shoot (not recorded in Middle English); akin to telge rod, Old Norse tjalga branch]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

tiller


Past participle: tillered
Gerund: tillering

Imperative
tiller
tiller
Present
I tiller
you tiller
he/she/it tillers
we tiller
you tiller
they tiller
Preterite
I tillered
you tillered
he/she/it tillered
we tillered
you tillered
they tillered
Present Continuous
I am tillering
you are tillering
he/she/it is tillering
we are tillering
you are tillering
they are tillering
Present Perfect
I have tillered
you have tillered
he/she/it has tillered
we have tillered
you have tillered
they have tillered
Past Continuous
I was tillering
you were tillering
he/she/it was tillering
we were tillering
you were tillering
they were tillering
Past Perfect
I had tillered
you had tillered
he/she/it had tillered
we had tillered
you had tillered
they had tillered
Future
I will tiller
you will tiller
he/she/it will tiller
we will tiller
you will tiller
they will tiller
Future Perfect
I will have tillered
you will have tillered
he/she/it will have tillered
we will have tillered
you will have tillered
they will have tillered
Future Continuous
I will be tillering
you will be tillering
he/she/it will be tillering
we will be tillering
you will be tillering
they will be tillering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been tillering
you have been tillering
he/she/it has been tillering
we have been tillering
you have been tillering
they have been tillering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been tillering
you will have been tillering
he/she/it will have been tillering
we will have been tillering
you will have been tillering
they will have been tillering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been tillering
you had been tillering
he/she/it had been tillering
we had been tillering
you had been tillering
they had been tillering
Conditional
I would tiller
you would tiller
he/she/it would tiller
we would tiller
you would tiller
they would tiller
Past Conditional
I would have tillered
you would have tillered
he/she/it would have tillered
we would have tillered
you would have tillered
they would have tillered
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tiller - a shoot that sprouts from the base of a grasstiller - a shoot that sprouts from the base of a grass
shoot - a new branch
2.tiller - someone who tills land (prepares the soil for the planting of crops)
farmer, granger, husbandman, sodbuster - a person who operates a farm
3.tiller - lever used to turn the rudder on a boat
lever - a rigid bar pivoted about a fulcrum
rudder - (nautical) steering mechanism consisting of a hinged vertical plate mounted at the stern of a vessel
4.tiller - a farm implement used to break up the surface of the soil (for aeration and weed control and conservation of moisture)
farm machine - a machine used in farming
harrow - a cultivator that pulverizes or smooths the soil
Verb1.tiller - grow shoots in the form of stools or tillers
acquire, develop, produce, grow, get - come to have or undergo a change of (physical features and attributes); "He grew a beard"; "The patient developed abdominal pains"; "I got funny spots all over my body"; "Well-developed breasts"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
ذِراع دَفَّة القارِب
kormidlová páka
rorpind
stjórnvölur
stūres grozīklis
kormidlová páka
dümen yekesi

tiller

[ˈtɪləʳ] N (Naut) → caña f del timón, timón m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

tiller

[ˈtɪlər] nbarre f, barre f du gouvernailtill receipt nticket m de caisse
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

tiller

1
n (Naut) → Ruderpinne f; at the tilleram Ruder; to take the tillerdas Ruder übernehmen

tiller

2
n (Agr) → Landmann m (old); tiller of the soil (liter)Ackersmann m (old), → Bebauer mder Scholle (liter)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

tiller

[ˈtɪləʳ] n (Naut) → barra del timone
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

tiller

(ˈtilə) noun
the handle or lever used to turn the rudder of a boat.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
(2006) do not support our results, since according to these authors, the tillering dynamics of elephant-grass managed under rotational stocking was not affected by the height of the stubble, which also increase the shading inside the canopy.
Shelter was exogenously sprayed at tillering, jointing, booting, earing, tillering and booting, tillering and jointing, jointing and earing, booting and earing, tillering, jointing and booting and tillering, jointing, booting and earing stages of wheat; while control plots were sprayed with distilled water.
Tillering was enhanced under CONT at one location where dry conditions occurred at seeding, while tillering was enhanced under NT at two locations where wet conditions delayed seeding.
Knowledge regarding the demography of the tillering process and its pattern of variation in relation to defoliation strategies used and seasons of the year favours the identification of management opportunities aiming at optimising the natural cycle of tiller appearance and death, basic condition for ensuring pasture stability and rational and sustainable use of grassland areas.
The characters such as plant height, number of tillers and high tillering capacity serve as agronomic, as well as morphological descriptors of the prevailing genetic diversity and this variation encountered, had a genetic basis.
In addition, a dwarf cultivar Pal, carrying the Dw6 dwarfing gene, was included because its tillering pattern differs markedly from that of conventional HE oats (Makela et al., 1996).
(1966) concluded that tillering increased as defoliation was relaxed because of carbohydrate buildup in stem bases where new tillers form.
Gala had the greatest proportion of seedlings tillering in the spring, followed by orchardgrass and Matua.
Due to increased tillering during this period, the sink for additionally fixed C at elevated p[CO.sub.2] must have been large, enabling the plant to benefit from the increased C supply.
Leaf morphological characteristics such as leaf length and width will affect leaf growth rate and thus leaf appearance rate and therefore ultimately tillering rates (Bos, 1999).
More recently tillering activity has been measured as site usage (Skinner and Nelson, 1992), or nodal probability (Matthew et al., 1998); effectively the proportion of tiller buds that eventually form new tillers, with a theoretical maximum of 1.00.