volumeter


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vol·u·me·ter

 (vŏl′yo͝o-mē′tər)
n.
Any of several instruments for measuring the volume of liquids, solids, or gases.

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

volumeter

(vɒˈljuːmɪtə)
n
1. (Tools) any instrument for measuring the volume of a solid, liquid, or gas
2. (General Physics) any instrument for measuring the volume of a solid, liquid, or gas
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

volumeter

an instrument for measuring the volumes of gases and liquids and of solids by the amount of gas or liquid they displace. — volumetric, volumetrical, adj.
See also: Instruments
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.volumeter - a meter to measure the volume of gases, liquids, or solids (either directly or by displacement)
meter - any of various measuring instruments for measuring a quantity
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
To calculate the density of each sample, its mass was determined using a set of precision scales and its global volume was determined using a carbon volumeter. Its density was then defined by Equation 1:
Respiratory rate and tidal volume were estimated breath to breath with the calculation of minute ventilation (Volumeter Blease, United Kingdom).
The water displacement volumeter (Figure 2) was designed and built by the authors based on the specifications of a commercially available device (Smith & Nephew lower extremity volumeter foot).
A foot volumeter was filled to capacity with water at room temperature (70-80[degrees]F).
Inspector Aspris said the ministry's checks were in line with the rest of Europe and the instrument used -- a volumeter -- is the same used all over the world.