weal

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Related to Wheals: angioedema

weal 1

 (wēl)
n.
1. Prosperity; happiness: in weal and woe.
2. The welfare of the community; the general good: the public weal.

[Middle English wele, from Old English wela; see wel- in Indo-European roots.]

weal 2

 (wēl)
n.
A ridge on the flesh raised by a blow; a welt.

[Alteration (influenced by wheal) of wale.]

weal

(wiːl)
n
(Pathology) a raised mark on the surface of the body produced by a blow. Also called: wale, welt or wheal
[C19: variant of wale1, influenced in form by wheal]

weal

(wiːl)
n
1. archaic prosperity or wellbeing (now esp in the phrases the public weal, the common weal)
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) obsolete the state
3. (Banking & Finance) obsolete wealth
[Old English wela; related to Old Saxon welo, Old High German wolo]

weal1

(wil)

n.
1. well-being, prosperity, or happiness: the public weal.
2. Obs. wealth or riches.
3. Obs. the body politic; the state.
[before 900; Middle English wele, Old English wela; akin to well1]

weal2

(wil)

n.
[variant of wale, with ea of wheal]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.weal - a raised mark on the skin (as produced by the blow of a whip); characteristic of many allergic reactions
harm, hurt, injury, trauma - any physical damage to the body caused by violence or accident or fracture etc.

weal

noun mark, scar, welt, ridge, streak, stripe, wheal, wale, contusion the red weals left across his chest by the whip

weal 1

noun
A state of health, happiness, and prospering:

weal 2

noun
A ridge or bump raised on the flesh, as by a lash or blow:
Translations

weal

1 [wiːl] N (esp Brit) (= wound) → verdugón m

weal

2 (archaic) [wiːl] N (= well-being) → bienestar m
the common wealel bien común

weal

[ˈwiːl] n (British) (= welt) → marque f

weal

1
n (liter)Wohl nt; the common/public wealdas allgemeine/öffentliche Wohl, das Allgemeinwohl; weal and woeWohl und Wehe nt

weal

2
n (= welt)Striemen m

weal

[wiːl] n (welt) → piaga
References in classic literature ?
On this accursed bed Don Quixote stretched himself, and the hostess and her daughter soon covered him with plasters from top to toe, while Maritornes- for that was the name of the Asturian- held the light for them, and while plastering him, the hostess, observing how full of wheals Don Quixote was in some places, remarked that this had more the look of blows than of a fall.
"There is the point, senora," replied Sancho Panza, "that I without dreaming at all, but being more awake than I am now, find myself with scarcely less wheals than my master, Don Quixote."
A broad wheal from an old scar ran right across it from eye to chin, and by its contraction had turned up one side of the upper lip, so that three teeth were exposed in a perpetual snarl.
Elaborating, he told that accident might have been caused due to fault in wheals of bogies or the track.
Children whose skin prick tests showed wheals of larger than 4 mm in diameter were excluded for presumed existing peanut allergy.
Children whose skin-prick tests showed wheals of larger than 4 mm in diameter were excluded for presumed existing peanut allergy.
Kimata is a Japanese allergist who first came to our attention in 2001 when he reported that watching a Charlie Chaplin movie (Modern Times) significantly decreased the size of skin wheals caused by allergen provocation.
Flora was well known in her community as a volunteer with the Berlin Meals on Wheals program.
Two tenders for the supply of (a) three articulated loaders on rubber wheals of not less than 2.5 M3 pot, also (b) other three vehicles duly equipped with a tower.
A This is a really irritating condition consisting of an itchy rash with red wheals, in some cases lasting many months.